Dusky Sunbird (Cinnyris fuscus)

The Dusky Sunbird (Cinnyris fuscus) is found in arid savanna, thickets and shrubland in southern Africa and is duller than most other sunbirds.

They can be found throughout Angola, Namibia, Botswana & South Africa.  I saw this one right near our room at Huab Lodge in Namibia.

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Birdlife

Biodiversity Explorer

VIDEOS

Here’s some slides with a sound clip.

 

Burchell’s Starling (Lamprotornis australis)

Burchell’s Starling or Burchell’s Glossy-starling (Lamprotornis australis) is a species of starling in the family Sturnidae.  The name of this bird commemorates the English naturalist William John Burchell.

They can be found in Angola, Botswana, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.  I had my best viewing at Kunene River Lodge but also saw a few in Etosha NP.

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Biodiversity Explorer

VIDEOS

A safari guide explains some bird facts.

Stunning close-up of this beautiful bird.  Note the black eyes which are a major identification point.

 

 

 

Goliath Heron (Ardea goliath)

The Goliath Heron (Ardea goliath), also known as the Giant Heron, is the largest heron in the world.

A younger Goliath Heron

They have a huge range in Africa but I can only recall seeing them during the Zambezi River Cruise in Livingstone and the sunset cruise at Kunene River Lodge.

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Heron Conservation

VIDEOS

Nice close ups here!

 

Fish for lunch!

 

Crocodile for dinner!

 

Red-headed Finch (Amadina erythrocephala)

The Red-headed Finch (Amadina erythrocephala) (also known as the Paradise Finch or the Red-headed Weaver) is a common species of estrildid finch found in Africa.

They have quite a large range in southern Africa.  I found this one while driving through Etosha NP in Namibia.

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Birdlife

Biodiversity Explorer

VIDEOS

It’s hard to find video clips of non-captive birds as this species seems to be very popular as aviary birds, but here’s one!

 

Purple Roller (Coracias naevius)

The Purple Roller (Coracias naevius), or rufous-crowned roller, is widespread in sub-Saharan Africa. Compared with other rollers its colours are rather dull and its voice rather harsh and grating.

They have a large range throughout southern Africa.  I saw this little guy in Etosha NP, Namibia.

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Birdlife

Siyabona Africa

VIDEOS

I found a couple clips of this beautiful little bird!

Shaft-tailed Whydah (Vidua regia)

The Shaft-tailed Whydah or Queen Whydah (Vidua regia) is a small, sparrow-like bird in the genus Vidua. During the breeding season the male has black crown and upper body plumage, golden breast and four elongated black tail shaft feathers with expanded tips. After the breeding season is over, the male sheds its long tail and grows olive brown female-like plumage.

They have a large range over much of southern Africa.  I saw several in Etosha NP, in Namibia, especially near Okakuejo Rest Camp.

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Birdlife

Flax Photography

VIDEO

There weren’t many options for this beautiful and graceful bird on Youtube but I did find one!

 

Fork-tailed Drongo (Dicrurus adsimilis)

The Fork-tailed Drongo, also called the Common Drongo, African Drongo, or Savanna drongo (Dicrurus adsimilis), is a species of drongo in the family Dicruridae, which are medium-sized passerine birds of the Old World. It is native to the tropics, subtropics and temperate zones of the Afrotropics.

This cheeky little bird is very common in Africa and you will see them just about everywhere!  These photos were taken in Namibia.  I have also seen them in Tanzania (everywhere) Kruger in South Africa and South Luangwa in Zambia.

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Birdlife

National Geographic

Tech Times

VIDEOS

They start out innocent enough.

Some can be friendly.

Others not so much.

Still others are downright devious!

 

 

 

Grey-headed Kingfisher (Halcyon leucocephala)

The Grey-headed Kingfisher (Halcyon leucocephala) has five subspecies:

  • H. l. acteon (Lesson, R, 1830) – Cape Verde Islands
  • H. l. leucocephala (Statius Müller, PL, 1776) – Senegal and Gambia to northwest Somalia, north Tanzania and north DR Congo
  • H. l. semicaerulea (Gmelin, JF, 1788) – south Arabian Peninsula
  • H. l. hyacinthina Reichenow, 1900 – southeast Somalia to Tanzania
  • H. l. pallidiventris Cabanis, 1880 – south DR Congo to northwest Tanzania and south to north South Africa

The ones I saw in Zambia would be the last subspecies, H. l. pallidiventris.

As you can see they have a huge range covering most of sub-Saharan Africa.  The photos above were taken by me in South Luangwa NP, Zambia.

LEARN MORE ABOUT GREY-HEADED KINGFISHERS

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Biodiversity Explorer

VIDEOS

Let’s see what Youtube has.  Here’s one from Ghana.

Another one from Gambia.

How about the Kenyan subspecies?

And lastly one from Kruger in South Africa which is the same subspecies as Zambia.

 

 

White-fronted Bee-eater (Merops bullockoides)

The White-fronted bee-eater (Merops bullockoides) is a species of bee-eater widely distributed in sub-equatorial Africa.  They have a distinctive white forehead, a square tail and a bright red patch on their throat. They nest in small colonies, digging holes in cliffs or earthen banks but can usually be seen in low trees waiting for passing insects from which they hunt either by making quick hawking flights or gliding down before hovering briefly to catch insects.

They have a very large range in southern Africa.  I saw them in Zambia in both Machile IBA & South Luangwa NP.

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Birdlife

Mashatu

VIDEOS

Preening action

Just hanging out waiting for food.

 

 

 

Hamerkop (Scopus umbretta)

The Hamerkop (Scopus umbretta), is a medium-sized wading bird. It is the only living species in the genus Scopus and the family Scopidae. The shape of its head with a long bill and crest at the back is reminiscent of a hammer, which has given this species its name.

With such a large range, you are almost guaranteed to see one on an African safari.  I know I have seen them in several places, most recently at South Luangwa NP in Zambia.

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Birdlife

Mpala Live

VIDEOS

Building a nest

Fresh frog for dinner

So who’s afraid of crocodiles, not me!