Chestnut-tipped Toucanet (Aulacorhynchus derbianus)

The Chestnut-tipped Toucanet (Aulacorhynchus derbianus) is a South American species of bird in the Ramphastidae family. It occurs in humid highland forests along the east Andean slope from southernmost Colombia to Bolivia.

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They can be found in the very southern part of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru & Bolivia.  They are fairly common in the Mindo area and I saw this one at the Mirador Restaurant near Milpe Sanctuary.

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LEARN MORE ABOUT CHESTNUT-TIPPED TOUCANETS

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Birdlife

Neotropical Birds

VIDEO

There wasn’t much on video of this bird but I did find one of the general area that includes the Toucanet at 11:08.  The mist gives you an idea of the weather I was dealing with during our trip.

 

 

Andean Cock-of-the-Rock (Rupicola peruvianus)

The Andean Cock-of-the-Rock (Rupicola peruvianus), also known as tunki (Quechua), is a large passerine bird of the cotinga family native to Andean cloud forests in South America. It is widely regarded as the national bird of Peru.

IMG_2873 DSCN1081 DSCN1076 DSCN1083 DSCN1074Watching their antics as they dance around hoping to attract the ladies is one of the highlights of a birding trip to South America.  There are a few leks easily accessible to tourists- Paz de las Aves (Angel Paz) near Mindo in Ecuador; Jardin in Colombia & the Cock of the Rock Lodge in Manu, Peru.

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LEARN MORE ABOUT COCKS OF THE ROCK

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Birdlife

Neotropical Birds

VIDEOS

This is a case where you need to see and hear the birds to fully appreciate them.  Here’s a few clips filmed (in order) in Mindo, Jardin & Manu.

 

Jabiru (Jabiru mycteria)

The Jabiru (Jabiru mycteria) is a large stork found in the Americas from Mexico to Argentina, except west of the Andes. It is most common in the Pantanal region of Brazil and the Eastern Chaco region of Paraguay. It is the only member of the genus Jabiru. The name comes from a Tupi–Guaraní language and means “swollen neck”.

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They have a huge range over most of South America and are very easy to see in the Pantanal of Brazil.  I was lucky enough to see some chicks in the nest with a parent!

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LEARN MORE ABOUT JABIRU STORKS

Wikipedia

Birdlife

Neotropical Birds

Forbes

VIDEOS

10 point landing!

Fish for lunch!

 

How Eco-tourism Benefits Indigenous People In Peru

Just a little reminder of why eco-tourism is so important to the indigenous people really anywhere we travel.   This article originally published by Peru For Less shows how the Ese Eja people in the Tambopata area of Peru have been exploited and cheated by large companies but how they are benefit by eco-lodges such as Refugio Amazonas.  I was lucky enough to visit there in 2007 and hope to go back someday.

Angela Tambopata--MacawsandAmazon